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Mailbag Question: The Release Loop On OST Board

Question:
Hi Mark! I watched your lake Erie show last night and you talked about putting a loop in the front clip of your Offshore board. I had a hard time seeing the line going into the clip. Can you describe how that loop goes into the clip? And why is that better than just putting the line in straight?

Answer:
We get a lot of questions about my rigging method for Off Shore boards. I rig my boards to release from the tow arm when a fish is hooked, yet remain pinned to the line via the OR16 Snap Weight clip at the back of the board. This allows me direct contact to the fish instead of fighting the board as it planes and also fish at the same time. After the lure is set behind the boat the desired distance, reach up to the rod tip and grab the fishing line with one hand. With your other hand pick up the line with just one finger, wrap the line around that finger five or six time. This creates a small loop of line with a few twists. I place the twisted line in the tow arm release allowing the loop to extend out beyond the release about 1/2 inch. The loop trick as I call it increases the surface area of the line and allows it to remain firmly in the release for getting the board out to the side. However, when it is time to release the board the loop trick allows the line to pop free of the release clean and with a lot less effort than simply putting the line straight into the release. A quick snap of the rod tip is all it takes to release the line to switch out baits or if a small fish is hooked. When a larger fish is hooked the fish itself will trip the release most times.


This trick works with monofilament, co-polymer lines and also fluorocarbon line. It doesn't work with super braids. 

Keep the loop of line small so it doesn't get tangled with the nut holding the release onto the tow arm.
Make sure the line is behind the pin between the pads of the OR16 clip. If the line isn't behind the pin the board will pop off the line when fighting a fish.